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SIMS21, Poland 2017 - Wenjing Xie abstract

Wenjing Xie oral presentation (OB2-Mon2-2-5)

Reactions of SO2 with Epoxy Groups on Graphite Oxide Powder

Wenjing Xie1, Lu-Tao Weng2,3, Chak-Keung Chan4, King Lun Yeung1,3, Chi-Ming Chan1,3

1 Division of Environment and Sustainability, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, - Hong Kong, Hong Kong
2 Materials Characterization and Preparation Facility, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, - Hong Kong, Hong Kong
3 Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, - Hong Kong, Hong Kong
4 School of Energy and Environment City University of Hong Kong, -, - Hong Kong, Hong Kong


Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a predominant industrial emission. Since it has adverse effects on both environment and humans, it is necessary to reduce the concentration of the pollutant. In this study, we prepared graphite oxide powder by the modified Hummers method and carried out the reaction between graphite oxide powder and SO2 gas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to characterize the surface of graphite oxide powder before and after the reaction. The results indicated that the epoxy groups were the major functional groups on the graphite oxide powder surface. The reaction mainly occurred at the epoxy groups on the surface, which could oxidize SO2 to bisulfate. The normalized ion intensities of the peaks like HSO4-, SO4- and SO3- increased in the ToF-SIMS spectrum of the graphite oxide powder after the reaction with SO2. In addition, a small amount of peaks like CH2SO4- and C2H3SO4- could also be found in the spectrum of the SO2-reacted graphite oxide powder. The presence of these peaks indicated the SO2 had reacted at and attached to the oxidation sites at the surface of the graphite oxide powder. The fundamental understanding of the reaction may lead to the development of a unique method for the removal of SO2.

* Corresponding author e-mail address: kecmchan@ust.hk (C.-M. Chan)

Acknowledgements

The work described in this paper was fully supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (grant no. 16300314).